Loss of newspapers contributes to political polarization

"Loss of newspapers contributes to political polarization" by David Bauder for AP, Jan. 30, 2019

"Among the other findings is less voter participation among news-deprived citizens in “off-year” elections where local offices are decided, Abernathy said. Another study suggested a link to increased government spending in communities where “watchdog” journalists have disappeared, she said."

"Loss of newspapers contributes to political polarization" by David Bauder for AP, Jan. 30, 2019

"Among the other findings is less voter participation among news-deprived citizens in “off-year” elections where local offices are decided, Abernathy said. Another study suggested a link to increased government spending in communities where... -->

The violence of the market

"The violence of the market" by Victor Pickard for Journalism, 2019

"But the most glaring manifestation of the market’s destruction of journalism is the sheer loss of jobs: the newspaper industry has been reduced by more than 50% since 2001 according to the U.S. bureau of labor statistics. Creating vast ‘news deserts’(Abernathy, 2016), newspaper closures, bankruptcies, and extreme downsizing are accelerated by ‘vulture capitalists’ swooping in to profit from the scraps (Reynolds, 2018)."

150 years of the Chattanooga Times Free Press spelled out in headlines

"150 years of the Chattanooga Times Free Press spelled out in headlines" by Davis Lundy for the Chattanooga Times Free Press, Jan. 13, 2019

"The people who owned newspapers in Chattanooga understood that journalism is not just a way to make money, but a calling," Abernathy said. "It is a mission-driven enterprise where the primary mission is to produce the news and information that feeds our democracy."

The outlook for journalists

"The outlook for journalists" by Karen Egolf for Crain's NewsPro, January 2019

Abernathy says legacy media that want to succeed need to set up a five-year plan and focus on the individual needs of their communities while also investing in their employees, or “human capital.” “That means there’s not going to be one business model that works for all news organizations or newspapers or whether you’re digital,” she says. “We found that with legacy newsrooms as well as digital startups that they look to others to say what has been the model that works. So they often end up pursuing what worked in one market that’s not even appropriate to [their] market.”